Week Two of SSC Academics

Food for Thought 101

Group photo of students sitting on stairs.

Hey Marauder,

 

Today’s post might seem like a sharp departure from the other things we’ve talked about this week, but it is actually more closely related than you think! This post provides tips and snack suggestions to help sustain balance through food, not just in spite of it. Let’s take a moment to think briefly about what makes eating at university challenging in the first place. When you live on residence, food is always nearby. The clear incentive is convenience, and I know what it’s like to depend on this. If you live off campus or are commuting, the temptation to buy food on campus might pull you in because it can free up your time in the morning at home. When deciding whether you should spend your money/meal card on campus for food or make some of it yourself, remember that making your own food:

  1. Gives you more control over what you eat
  2. Allows you to be more health-conscious
  3. Can be more economical

Whether you will live next door to an endless supply of food or will be cooking for yourself for the first time, we want to help you use food to find balance. Eating at university provides you with a unique opportunity to build your capacity for independence, and your meal plan or ability to buy food on campus don’t have to be the only things that govern this. Managing your time and supporting your own nutrition might not be easy at first, but the opportunity to give it a try is right around the corner! (No, seriously, September is so soon!)

 

Let’s get right to the fun part! I wanted to share some of the recipes that I came across that don’t require any culinary expertise. If you take a little extra time to make some of these items a few times a week, you can build habits that are healthy for you, your independence, your wallet, and your ability to find balance! These recipes require minimal ingredients and prep time and are often more about assembling a few ingredients than actually cooking things. Give them a try and see if any of them could convince you to avoid buying 100% of your snacks, drinks, and meals on campus.

Want to sleep in instead of running to the dining hall? Try these easy breakfast options:

  • Overnight oats
  • Granola bars
  • Toast with bananas, peanut butter, and toppings (seeds, hemp hearts, cinnamon) of your choice
  • Toast with avocado

Want to save your time between classes and avoid having to walk across campus to get your favourite dish? Try these lunch options—no microwave needed:

  • Yogurt with berries and granola
  • Pasta salad dumped on greens
  • Bagels (if you really don’t want to make these at home first, check out Union Market in MUSC!)

What about snacks and drinks? You’d be surprised how quickly things add up if you regularly buy these items on campus.

  • Apples and peanut butter
  • Granola bars (Yes even if you had one already! Truly my favourite snack; I don’t know who I’d be without granola bars)
  • Hummus with veggies or pita

Bonus: I promise you can make yourself a smoothie at home. You can do it! Save those meal plan dollars if you have them!

I know it might seem frivolous to think about eating habits when the stress of your classes is looming, but I promise it’s better to think about this than to ignore it. Food is important for balance, academics, and a number of other things. There’s just no way around it—your brain needs food, marauder!

Sincerely,

Emily

Join the conversation: What is your favourite snack to have on the go?

What makes balancing your engagement with academics, people, and events difficult? How can you do it? Read more about this in Balance 101!

How should I approach scheduling? What do I need to include? Are to-do lists actually helpful? Scheduling 101 has the answers!

Should I buy all of my food on campus? What can I make for myself that will actually be quick and easy? Is it worth it to make some of my own food at all? Get answers to these (and other) questions in Food for Thought 101!

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